Juniper SRX IDP (IDS/IPS) and SCREEN (DoS) Logs to Splunk

Juniper SRX IDP (IDS/IPS) and SCREEN (DoS) logs can be sent to a remote host via Syslog.

You might have come across IT security compliance requirements asking for visibility across your IDP and DoS attack event logs. One of the solution is sending all your security logs to a centralised logging system such as Splunk then perform all the required actions such as creating reports, dashboards and sending alerts from there.

In this example I have documented what are the configuration requirements to send Juniper SRX IDP and SCREEN logs to Splunk via Syslog.

Step 1: Setup Splunk to listen on UDP 514 (Syslog)

Make sure you have a running Splunk. Also you have configured Splunk to listen on UDP port 514 as syslog. This can be done via adding the following onto the file >> “/opt/splunk/etc/system/local/inputs.conf

[udp://514]
sourcetype = syslog

You can install the following Juniper Apps available in the Splunk app store:

-Splunk Add-on for Juniper
-Juniper Networks App for Splunk

If you do not have the above apps installed – you still can create your Splunk dashboards, reports & alerts manually based on the fields within the captured IDP and SCREEN logs.

Make sure SRX firewalls are able to talk to the Splunk server over the network.

Step 2: Setup SCREEN options

Make sure you have implemented SCREEN options. A bunch of options are available for SCREEN; here is some examples:

#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options icmp ip-sweep
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options icmp ping-death
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options ip bad-option
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options ip spoofing
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options ip tear-drop
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp syn-fin
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp tcp-no-flag
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp syn-frag
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp port-scan
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp syn-ack-ack-proxy
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp syn-flood white-list PenTest-TempWhitelist source-address 123.xxx.xxx.xxx/32
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp syn-flood white-list PenTest-TempWhitelist source-address 123.xxx.xxx.xxx/32
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp land
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp winnuke
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options tcp tcp-sweep
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options udp flood
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options udp udp-sweep
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options udp port-scan
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options limit-session source-ip-based 1000
#set security screen ids-option internet-screen-options limit-session destination-ip-based 1000

Step 3: Enable logging within IDP Rulebase

Make sure you have an active IDP policy and you have also enabled IDP within security policies.

#show security idp active-policy
active-policy Recommended;

The above command shows current active policy “Recommended”; the default “Recommended” policy comes with “then notification log-attacks” along with “action recommended” as following:

then {
 action {
 recommended;
 }
 notification {
 log-attacks;
 }
 }

If you create a custom policy, make sure your policy is configured with “notifications log-attacks“.

Also make sure you have enabled IDP within “security policy”. Following is an example of enabling IDP within a security policy:

#set security policy from-zone sec-zone-source to-zone sec-zone-destination policy name-of-sec-policy then permit application-services idp

Step 4: Setup SRX firewalls to send logs to Syslog

SRX IDP logs are marked with RT_IDP.
SRX SCREEN logs are marked with RT_IDS.

You need to filter logs to capture the above while sending them to a remote syslog server.

#set system syslog host 172.16.xx.10 any any
#set system syslog host 172.16.xx.10 match "RT_IDP|RT_IDS"
#set system syslog host 172.16.xx.10 source-address 172.16.xx.5
#set system syslog host 172.16.xx.10 structured-data brief
#set system syslog file messages any any

Now generate some port scanning towards firewall interfaces where the SCREEN and IDP policies are applied. You can use “https://pentest-tools.com/network-vulnerability-scanning/tcp-port-scanner-online-nmap” to send some quick scan.

You should be able see SCREEN logs as following >

root@firewall-host-name> show log messages | match RT_IDS
Oct 13 14:53:22 firewall-host-name RT_IDS: RT_SCREEN_TCP: TCP port scan! source: 178.79.138.22:39267, destination: 118.xxx.xxx.xxx:990, zone name: sec-zone-internet, interface name: reth0.XXX, action: drop
Oct 13 14:53:43 firewall-host-name RT_IDS: RT_SCREEN_TCP: No TCP flag! source: 178.79.138.22:50779, destination: 118.xxx.xx.xxx:443, zone name: sec-zone-internet, interface name: reth0.XXX, action: drop
Oct 13 14:53:43 firewall-host-name RT_IDS: RT_SCREEN_TCP: SYN and FIN bits! source: 178.79.138.22:50780, destination: 118.xxx.xxx.xxx:443, zone name: sec-zone-internet, interface name: reth0.XXX, action: drop

Following are example of IDP attack event logs >

Oct 13 08:55:55 firewall-host-name 1 2017-10-13T08:55:55.792+11:00 firewall-host-name RT_IDP - IDP_ATTACK_LOG_EVENT [junos@2636.1.1.1.2.135 epoch-time="1507845354" message-type="SIG" source-address="183.78.180.27" source-port="45610" destination-address="118.127.xx.xx" destination-port="80" protocol-name="TCP" service-name="SERVICE_IDP" application-name="HTTP" rule-name="9" rulebase-name="IPS" policy-name="Recommended" export-id="15229" repeat-count="0" action="DROP" threat-severity="HIGH" attack-name="TROJAN:ZMEU-BOT-SCAN" nat-source-address="0.0.0.0" nat-source-port="0" nat-destination-address="172.xx.xx.xx" nat-destination-port="0" elapsed-time="0" inbound-bytes="0" outbound-bytes="0" inbound-packets="0" outbound-packets="0" source-zone-name="sec-zone-name-internet" source-interface-name="reth0.XXX" destination-zone-name="dst-sec-zone1-outside" destination-interface-name="reth1.xxx" packet-log-id="0" alert="no" username="N/A" roles="N/A" message="-"]

Now search in the Splunk with RT_SCREEN for SCREEN logs and IDP_ATTACK_LOG for IDP logs.

Here is few example screenshots from Splunk.

[Screenshot – Official Juniper App from Splunk App Store]

IDP-Splunk-OffcialJuniperApp-2

[Screenshot – IDP_ATTACK_LOG within Splunk]

IDP-Splunk-2

[Screenshot – SCREEN action logs]

IDP-Splunk-3

[Screenshot – Splunk Dashboard IDP Attack Events]

IDP-Splunk-4

The above dashboard has been created with the following search parameter:

IDP_ATTACK_LOG_EVENT 
| rename host as Firewall-Name
| rename attack_name as Attack-Name
| rename threat_severity as Threat-Severity
| rename action as Action
| rename policy_name as IDP-Policy-Name
| rename source_address as Attacker-IP
| rename source_interface_name as Src-Interface
| rename source_zone_name as Src-Security-Zone
| rename destination_address as Dst-Address
| rename destination_interface_name as Dst-Interface
| rename destination_zone_name as Dst-Security-Zone
| rename destination_port as Dst-Port
| rename nat_destination_address as Internal-Dst-NAT-Address
| table Firewall-Name, Attack-Name, Threat-Severity, Action, IDP-Policy-Name, Attacker-IP, Src-Interface, Src-Security-Zone, Dst-Address, Dst-Interface, Dst-Port, Internal-Dst-NAT-Address, Dst-Security-Zone, _time

[Screenshot – Splunk Dashboard SCREEN Attack Events]

IDP-Splunk-5

You can create Splunk “alerts” based on the same above!

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